Research Funding Sources

Finding cost-effective weed and nutrient management practices in organic pear orchards

Summary

Investigator: Chuck Ingels, University of California Cooperative Extension, Sacramento County, Sacramento, California
Project location: Joe Green Ranch, Courtland, California (certified organic in 2009)

Enhancing insect pest management in organic systems using genotypically diverse cultivar mixtures

Summary

Coordinator: John Tooker, Pennsylvania State University
Project location: Russel Larson Agricultural Research Center, Rock Springs, PA

Integrated soil-borne disease and weed management for organic strawberries using anaerobic soil disinfestation, broccoli residue incorporation and mustard cake application

Summary

Investigator: Carol Shennan, University of California, Santa Cruz, Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems
Stakeholders: Organic strawberry producers

Reducing risk associated with organic snap bean production in Wisconsin

Summary

Investigator: James Nienhuis, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
Project location: Wisconsin

Farmer-based evolutionary participatory plant breeding for organic quinoa, buckwheat, and spelt

The purpose of this project was to identify varieties of quinoa, buckwheat and spelt optimally adapted to organic farming systems in Washington State. Quinoa varieties have been identified that perform well in both Eastern and Western Washington. The multi-location quinoa variety trials have led to the establishment of a robust organic quinoa breeding and agronomy program, with multiple students incorporating genetic, agroecological and social aspects into their research.

Organic cover crop seed production as a sustainable enterprise for the Southeast

Summary

Investigator: Ray Hicks, University of Georgia, Screven County Cooperative Extension, Sylvania, Georgia
Project location: Screven County, East Central Georgia

Creating two open pollinated, sugary enhanced sweet corn varieties

Investigator: Jonathan Spero, Lupine Knoll Farm, Williams, Oregon

Project location: Oregon

Maintaining our own seed allows the farmer to adapt seeds to his or her location and growing methods. Seed saving requires open pollinated varieties. Development work in the last 50 or more years has been almost entirely based on hybrids. While hybrids have advantages in creation of corn that is both uniform and productive, we can create open pollinated varieties that are better than any op’s now available.

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