Blogs | July 2014

Rachel Goodman's picture

New Study Shows Organic Crops Contain More Anti-oxidants/Fewer Pesticides

Consumers choose organic foods for many reasons- for example, because the food is produced in a way that is better for the environment. Now, a new comprehensive review of previous studies shows mounting evidence organic crops may also contain more anti-oxidants and fewer pesticide residues.  In a new study published today in the British Journal of Nutrition researchers at Newcastle University in England have found that organic crops overall contain 17% more key anti-oxidants than non-organically grown crops, while some classes of anti-oxidants known as flavinones, were found at a rate 69% higher. Anti-oxidants are components in fighting cancer and are thought to play a key role in preventing heart disease and neurodegenerative disease

Karen Adler's picture

Breeding “Organic Ready” Corn

Amidst the controversy over transgene (GMO) contamination—a growing concern for organic farmers, researchers, consumers, and advocates—plant breeder Frank Kutka has been working to develop an “organic ready” line of corn that will maintain its non-GMO integrity. Corn is one of the top three genetically modified crops, alongside cotton and soy. In 2014, 89 percent of the corn acreage in the U.S. is planted in herbicide-tolerant transgenic corn.
 
Kutka has just started his fourth year of an OFRF/Seed Matters-funded research project, Developing “Organic-Ready” Maize Populations with Gametophytic Incompatibility. Corn is wind pollinated and readily crosses with other varieties. However, this breeding work uses naturally occurring genes derived from popcorns and the ancient grain teosinte that create a screen against crossing with transgenic, or genetically modified (GMO) corn. 

 

Organic Seed Survey Seeks Input from Certified Organic Crop Producers

OFRF invites your participation in a national seed survey conducted by our friends at the Organic Seed Alliance, an organization we are proud to support in numerous endeavors, including the recently published set of four manuals to help farmers breed the seed they need, as well as the Organic Participa

Soils on Organic Farms Could Reverse Effects of Climate Change

From our friends at the Rodale Institute comes a new study titled “Regenerative Organic Agriculture and Climate Change.”  The study investigates how farming systems affect greenhouse gas emission, and shows the benefits of organic agriculture in slowing and even slowing climate change. Key to that process is how organic farmers manage their soil.  The study concludes that greenhouse gas emissions could be reduced by 40 percent if all current cropland was managed organically.