Mark Keating's picture

We Must Prevent Approval of 2,4-D Resistant Soy and Corn

By Mark Keating, OFRF Policy Consultant

In a major development in the escalating controversy over genetically engineered (GE) crops, the USDA has released its Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for two varieties of soybeans and one of corn which are resistant to the highly toxic herbicide 2,4-D.  In a disturbing move, the USDA is recommending the unrestricted release of all three varieties, thereby paving the way for their potential planting on millions of acres.  

Karen Adler's picture

Feeding the Future with Ancient Grains

By Karen Adler

You may have noticed grains such as quinoa, buckwheat, and spelt skyrocketing into high demand in recent years in the U.S. You may have even wondered who is meeting that demand. As it turns out, little is known about growing these and other delicious, nutritious, and potentially lucrative crops outside of their native regions, where they have been grown for thousands of years. With funding from OFRF, Kevin Murphy at Washington State University and his team of farmer and university collaborators set out to change that by identifying varieties of quinoa, buckwheat and spelt optimally adapted to organic farming systems in Washington State. From the onset, this project was requested and initiated by organic farmers and continues to rely on farmer participation.

Klaas Martens's picture

Some of the Most Vital Research Needs Time and Money to Bear Fruit

By Klaas Martens, OFRF Board Member

"When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe."
- Naturalist, John Muir

Imagine what more than a century of studying soil in one place might tell us?

The Morrow plots were established in 1876 and are the second oldest long-term systems trials (LTST) in the world.  Data from the Morrow plots has shown that: "soil quality is a vital component of agricultural productivity." The oldest continuously operating system trial is at Rothamsted Manor in England.  It started in 1843 just as synthetic fertilizer manufacturing was beginning to study its effect on soil and wheat production.

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