Karen Adler's picture

The ABCs of GMOs

By Karen Adler, OFRF Research Consultant

The writing is on the wall—and in newspapers, magazines, and all over the internet. Most Americans want GMO labeling—93 percent, according to this New York Times survey. Even Family Circle magazine weighed in citing their poll showing that 99 percent of their readers want labeling. It’s already heating up for 2014, with Maine becoming the second state to require GMO labels, and more than half of U.S. states with pending labeling legislation. And how about industrial food giant General Mills ringing in the New Year by announcing that they will soon take their iconic Cheerios GMO-free? (Never mind that Cheerios, being made mostly from oats, are almost GMO-free already, since there are no genetically modified oats.) What really makes this big news is that General Mills identified a consumer desire of a magnitude that is driving them to jumpstart this bandwagon on a grand scale.

Mark Keating's picture

Good News for Organics in the Latest Federal Spending Bill

By Mark Keating, OFRF Policy Consultant

            In a hopeful sign Monday that Washington is returning to the peoples’ business, the House and Senate Appropriations Committees released a compromise fiscal year 2014 budget which both chambers will vote on this week. The spending bill sets funding levels for specific government programs using the budget ceiling of $1.1 trillion agreed to by the House and Senate Budget Committees back in December.

Mark Keating's picture

We Must Prevent Approval of 2,4-D Resistant Soy and Corn

By Mark Keating, OFRF Policy Consultant

In a major development in the escalating controversy over genetically engineered (GE) crops, the USDA has released its Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for two varieties of soybeans and one of corn which are resistant to the highly toxic herbicide 2,4-D.  In a disturbing move, the USDA is recommending the unrestricted release of all three varieties, thereby paving the way for their potential planting on millions of acres.  

Pages

Subscribe to Organic Farming Research Foundation RSS