Weed Management

Cover Crops for Weed Management in Organic Vegetables

In the summer of 2000, we received a research grant from the Organic Farming Research Foundation to study over-seeded cover crops in summer vegetables to control weeds. We conducted this study at the WSU Vancouver Research and Extension Unit (WSU VREU), and intended to study the influence of summer over-seeded cover crops on vegetable crop production and weed populations in an organic

Development and Evaluation of Biologically-Integrated Conservation Tillage Systems for Organic Vegetable Production

A primary goal in developing environmentally sound and profitable farming systems has been to prevent soil degradation and erosion loss, and wherever possible, enhance soil quality through organic matter management. Conventional tillage practices currently used for vegetable production in the Willamette Valley involve from 5-8 passes over the field. For the past four years we have been working with vegetable growers in the Willamette Valley to develop an integrated system of vegetable production using winter annual cover crops and rotary strip- tillage.

Use of Walnut Hulls for Weed Control

Weed control was cited as one of the primary problems for organic growers,

Controlling weeds using propane generated flame and steam treatments in crop and non croplands

The purpose of this study is to examine if thermal treatment of weeds will provide effective control on an established certified organic farm and whether steam treatment of crops and field borders in the spring, summer and fall can reduce annual, biennial and perennial weeds common along the Colorado Front Range. A flame treatment will be compared to a steam treatment efficacy for the control of weeds and insects in alfalfa.

New cover crops and cover crop management for organic vegetable producers in Maryland (yr. 1)

This project was designed to provide the organic farmers with information they are seeking and have requested,
specifically regarding the use of cover crops other than cereal rye and hairy vetch. This information will help
organic farmers increase their farm productivity while using natural, sustainable, on-farm methods to minimize
weeds, maintain soil quality, and provide nitrogen.
The project has 3 objectives:

Effect of Compost Extracts on Organic Seed Germination and Reduction of Weed Seed Expression

Organic growers consider weeds their number one problem in crop production. Organic growers whether they grow vegetables, grains, herbs, berries, or native plants are constantly on the lookout for finding new technology that reduce severity of weed problems and yield losses. One method is to assess whether the use of compost extract would lead to weed seed suppression for better crop seed emergence.

Garlic Producer Closes In On Successful Weeding Strategies


Effectiveness and economic impact of weed control systems in organic garlic production

Investigator and project location: Susan Fluegel, Grey Duck Garlic, Moscow, Idaho

Effect of Compost Extracts on Organic Seed Germination and Reduction of Weed Seed Expression

Effect of Compost Extracts on Organic Seed Germination
Coordinator: Gladis Zinati, Ph.D., The Rodale Institute, Kutztown, PA
Stakeholders: Organic farmers

Finding cost-effective weed and nutrient management practices in organic pear orchards


Investigator: Chuck Ingels, University of California Cooperative Extension, Sacramento County, Sacramento, California
Project location: Joe Green Ranch, Courtland, California (certified organic in 2009)


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